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Now distributed in Canada by Manitobah Mukluks. Free shipping & Returns. See Details

Black Brown
Black Brown

Lord of the Plains Blanket

Regular price $399.00
Black Brown

Description

  • Reversible
  • 64" x 80" (163 x 203 cm)
  • Napped, felt bound
  • 82% pure virgin wool/18% cotton
  • Dry clean
  • Made in the USA

Sun, the Creator, shines on the Backbone of the World, the homeland of the Blackfeet Nation. Below, Moon cradles their child, Morning Star, Bringer of Dreams. Between Moon and another symbol for the Star Child shine the Star Beings that make up the Big and Little Dipper constellations. The Lords of the Plains ride below. They wear sacred straight-up eagle feather headdresses. Their masked horses are painted with medicine symbols for protection in travel and battle. Below the riders, a teepee rests among symbols of the rolling hills of the homelands. Black, a power colour, encloses the world of the Lords as they preserve their spiritual traditions and way of life.

Terrance Guardipee is an internationally acclaimed Blackfeet artist. Originally from Montana, he attended the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe and currently resides in Seattle, Washington. His vibrant and innovative art incorporates a contemporary palette and traditional ledger art in his signature map collage concept. His artworks are included in museum collections across the USA and internationally, including the Smithsonian Institute. He was the featured artist for the National Museum of the American Indian in 2007. His work has garnered numerous awards, and inspired the creation of a category specifically for ledger artists at the Santa Fe Indian Art market.

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Legendary Collection

Each year a new design is added to the Legendary Series, which honours Indigenous culture, symbols, traditions, ceremonies and beliefs. This original exclusive designs are collectible heirlooms of tomorrow that can be used and enjoyed today.

Made in the USA

Our heirloom-quality wool blankets are made in the USA using wool that is sourced from ranches around the country. We’ve been a family-owned business for over 150 years, and for 104 of those years we've been weaving world class woolens in our Northwest Mills. You can rely on a Pendleton for a lifetime of comfort and beauty.

Pendleton Heritage

In 1889, Thomas Kay opened his first mill in Salem, Oregon where his eldest daughter, Fannie, learned the textile business. When she married retail merchant C.P. Bishop, a complementary combination of merchandising and manufacturing expertise emerged - a solid foundation for what was to become Pendleton Woolen Mills. In 1895, the company’s woolen mill began making bed blankets and robes for the American Indigenous community. In September of that same year, the first products emerged from the new finishing department and the tradition of Pendleton Woolen Mills began.

Making a Pendleton

Pendleton is founded on an intimate knowledge of the wool business – from fiber to fabric. Whether it’s a wool garment, wool fabric, or a wool blanket, Pendleton offers over 100 years of expertise, imagination and dedication to quality. As a world-leading, vertically integrated wool manufacturer, Pendleton uses sophisticated information systems to ensure a balanced flow of raw materials through production and on to finished products available at top retailers across the globe.

Our Wool

Pendleton raw wool is processed before it is made into fabric, which is then constructed and woven into home and fashion products, as well as apparel and accessories for men and women. Our direct relationships with sheep farmers, and vertical manufacturing gives Pendleton the advantage of monitoring every step of the production process to maintain quality and value throughout at each stage of production. Our wool buyers shop world markets, but most of Pendleton's wool still comes from the United States.

Indigenous Trading Blanket History

From 1909, Pendleton has produced Indigenous blankets, robes and shawls. Today, Pendleton is deeply connected to the American Indigenous community. Prior to the introduction of mill techniques, traditional blankets were made from hides or pelts of smaller animals which had been sewn together or woven from wool, feathers, down, bark and cotton; and, in some areas, shredded cedar bark. These colourful blankets were integrated into everyday and ceremonial uses; part of a dowry, weddings, gift-giving, powwows, dance prizes, naming ceremonies, funerals and memorials.