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Now distributed in Canada by Manitobah Mukluks. Free shipping & Returns. See Details

7 Generations
7 Generations
7 Generations
7 Generations
7 Generations

Nike® N7 Blanket

7 Generations
Regular price $529.00
7 Generations

Description

  • PendletReversible
  • 64" x 80" (163 x 203 cm)
  • Unnapped, whipstitch binding
  • 82% pure virgin wool/18% cotton
  • Dry clean
  • Made in the USA

Innovation meets tradition with this collaboration between Nike N7 and Pendleton Woolen Mills. 7 Generations illustrates the past, present and future of the Native peoples. The central N7 motif represents the impact of each person (the diamond) on the three generations before and after (arrows). A storm pattern with zigzags of lightning honors heritage. Squared corners echo the
Four Sacred Mountains, surrounded by a dazzler design. Steps show the path to overcoming life’s challenges. Colors inspired by traditional dyes reflect the southwestern landscape. 7 Generations was designed by Tracie Jackson (Diné), a 4th generation artisan from Star Mountain. 

Nike N7 is committed to inspiring and enabling participation in sport for Indigenous populations in North America. We believe that sport has the power to unleash human potential. A physically active lifestyle promotes more than exercise. Involvement in sports and physical activity leads to greater self-confidence, enabling youth to be a force for positive change in their communities.

A portion of the proceeds from this blanket will be donated to the American Indian College Fund.

Reviews

American Indian College Fund

Since 1990, Pendleton has been proud to support the work of the American Indian College Fund - a Native American-operated organization dedicated to education. Sales of these blankets fund scholarships to tribal colleges and make a difference in the lives of students.

Made in the USA

Our heirloom-quality wool blankets are made in the USA using wool that is sourced from ranches around the country. We’ve been a family-owned business for over 150 years, and for 104 of those years we've been weaving world class woolens in our Northwest Mills. You can rely on a Pendleton for a lifetime of comfort and beauty.

Pendleton Heritage

In 1889, Thomas Kay opened his first mill in Salem, Oregon where his eldest daughter, Fannie, learned the textile business. When she married retail merchant C.P. Bishop, a complementary combination of merchandising and manufacturing expertise emerged - a solid foundation for what was to become Pendleton Woolen Mills. In 1895, the company’s woolen mill began making bed blankets and robes for the American Indigenous community. In September of that same year, the first products emerged from the new finishing department and the tradition of Pendleton Woolen Mills began.

Making a Pendleton

Pendleton is founded on an intimate knowledge of the wool business – from fiber to fabric. Whether it’s a wool garment, wool fabric, or a wool blanket, Pendleton offers over 100 years of expertise, imagination and dedication to quality. As a world-leading, vertically integrated wool manufacturer, Pendleton uses sophisticated information systems to ensure a balanced flow of raw materials through production and on to finished products available at top retailers across the globe.

Our Wool

Pendleton raw wool is processed before it is made into fabric, which is then constructed and woven into home and fashion products, as well as apparel and accessories for men and women. Our direct relationships with sheep farmers, and vertical manufacturing gives Pendleton the advantage of monitoring every step of the production process to maintain quality and value throughout at each stage of production. Our wool buyers shop world markets, but most of Pendleton's wool still comes from the United States.

Indigenous Trading Blanket History

From 1909, Pendleton has produced Indigenous blankets, robes and shawls. Today, Pendleton is deeply connected to the American Indigenous community. Prior to the introduction of mill techniques, traditional blankets were made from hides or pelts of smaller animals which had been sewn together or woven from wool, feathers, down, bark and cotton; and, in some areas, shredded cedar bark. These colourful blankets were integrated into everyday and ceremonial uses; part of a dowry, weddings, gift-giving, powwows, dance prizes, naming ceremonies, funerals and memorials.

Blankets That Give Back

The American Indian College Fund is an Indigenous-operated organization dedicated to education. Currently, more than 30 tribal colleges serve American Indigenous students from every geographic region in the United States. The AICF fund provides educational opportunities for students and disburses 6,000 scholarships annually. For a century, Pendleton Woolen Mills has maintained a mutual respect for America’s Indigenous community, the company’s original customers. A portion of the proceeds from American Indian College Fund blankets goes to help tribal colleges make a bigger impact.